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JD 400 Repower

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Trey Trenkamp
Member
Username: Trenkamp400
KS
Registered: 1-2011
Post Number: 2
Posted on Sunday, September 18, 2011 - 12:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My 20hp kohler engine finally gave up on me last week. I'm looking to Repower with a 23hp or more vanguard. Does anyone have and suggestions on if this would be a good Repower motor and how much modification is needed to install it.
Thanks
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Tony Rader
Member
Username: Trader
MO
Registered: 8-2011
Post Number: 7
Posted on Sunday, September 18, 2011 - 9:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Trey, first off do a search on 400 repowers. There are alot of good threads on this and also a lot of different ways of accomplishing this. I do not have any experience with the vangards, but have installed a 24 horse honda in a 400 and a 25 horse kohler in a 420. Of the two repowers i have done the 420 was more modification work than the 400. We used a kit on the 400/honda and I pieced together the parts for my 420. Both engines we used have been great. Some of the mods you will be looking at are engine mounts, wiring adaptation, pto cable guard and possibly driveshaft length, which I would take a serious look at the u-joints while I am in there.
Any questions just ask.
Tony
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Dan Dillner
Member
Username: Captaindan
VT
Registered: 6-2010
Post Number: 302
Posted on Sunday, September 18, 2011 - 9:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Trey, You can also learn a lot if you search on 420 or 318 repower. I have used the Briggs 23 in a 420 and have documented my process. It might be of some help to you. Here is a link to my repower in the 420.
https://picasaweb.google.com/106460198938703134721/JD420Repower?authkey=Gv1sRgCKj71azXzvnyxwE
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Mike Meyer
Member
Username: 7dad34
Illinois
Registered: 3-2007
Post Number: 1367
Posted on Monday, September 19, 2011 - 7:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm going to pound the drum to rebuild the engine you have. The cost of a rebuild might be cheaper if you yourself can do most of the work. To have a second party do all the work might not be so cheap in the end.
Go ahead ...everyone...roll your eyes...My Mechanic friend says ..the Kohler engine you have in your hands was designed specifically for that 400. Yes, you can buy a new engine for it but the HP and Torque won't be the same.
The other argument is with the newer engine , you get the better efficiency.
The biggest thing is, it's your tractor and money. What you end up doing..not many people are going to stop and ask what did you go with ? They're gonna see you cutting grass, blowing snow and won't much care or think about what is making that thing go.
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Eric M
Member
Username: Emmvette
IA
Registered: 5-2011
Post Number: 37
Posted on Monday, September 19, 2011 - 11:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

For comparison, I'm rebuilding mine now. Total cost with complete replacement of ALL necessary OEM Kohler parts and machine shop labor will be $900 plus my time. It is getting all new rods, pistons +0.020", bushings, bearings, exhaust valves and guides, etc. "the works".
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David C.Dunbar
Member
Username: Motiv8
MA
Registered: 11-2008
Post Number: 52
Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2011 - 5:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Eric M,
Where did you obtain your new Kohler eng parts? I see many times where a 400 w/ K532 eng has a failed con rod. Some say there is inadequate oil supply. Has this been investigated for a remedy? Or were both rods about to fail because of overheating from plugged cooler fins,low oil pressure, etc., or poor, contaminated oil or running "heavy" number oil? I'd appreciate opinions and experiences on this subject. I'm considering converting the rods to insert bearings on a few K532s here to possibly eliminate a weak link. David
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Lee Hyder
Member
Username: 69project
KY
Registered: 3-2010
Post Number: 4
Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2011 - 5:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would say the lack of rod bearings is what dooms these engines.

I have heard good things about the Vanguard replacement engine. With that said, on Ebay there is a company advertising a 33hp Generac engine as a drop in replacement. It's spendy but I guess for over 50% more hp it might be worth it.
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Scott Reynolds
Member
Username: Sreynolds
OH
Registered: 9-2007
Post Number: 451
Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2011 - 6:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I rebuilt mine and performed most work myself outside the crank grind/block bore and new vales with seating them.

The short block rebuild was cheaper. However, with all the extras like carb/governor/electronic ignition/coils/dip stick tube yada yada it would have been best to replace it.

When the 532 "runs well" I don't need any more power, but longevity is more my concern. I live in a diesel world, and would like to see one million miles on my 532 prior to another rebuild.
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Mike Meyer
Member
Username: 7dad34
Illinois
Registered: 3-2007
Post Number: 1373
Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2011 - 9:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

David,
Every symptom you listed would kill just about any or all makes of engines John Deere has used over the years. The biggest Kohler 532/582 killer is oil pressure, hence the huge suggestion for the oil pressure gauge when you do this rebuild.
The other contributing factor in the motor's breakdown is the cam bearings going bad, probably due to poor lubrication.
The K582 I rebuilt with all kinds of help here I'm sure will be running long after my days are over.
One big thing you questioned would be the cooling fins being clogged...uh yup ! Get them cleared.
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Mike Meyer
Member
Username: 7dad34
Illinois
Registered: 3-2007
Post Number: 1374
Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2011 - 10:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

And,
Go with Pat's Small Engines out of Minnesota. Good parts and prices.
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David C.Dunbar
Member
Username: Motiv8
MA
Registered: 11-2008
Post Number: 53
Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 6:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mike,
Thanks for your input. I've been a professional mechanic and engine builder 56 yrs so far. Done racing motorcycle, oval track air cooled VWs, some aircraft units. I convert many antique auto and marine rods to inserts, although some get reBabbitted. Thanks for the Pat's lead. David
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David C.Dunbar
Member
Username: Motiv8
MA
Registered: 11-2008
Post Number: 54
Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 6:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Will anyone on this thread donate a slightly galled, unusable K532 conrod for an insert bearing conversion experiment? I'll pay the postage. Email in profile. Thanks in advance. David
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Scott Reynolds
Member
Username: Sreynolds
OH
Registered: 9-2007
Post Number: 452
Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 7:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sure.........I don't need them.
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Dan Dillner
Member
Username: Captaindan
VT
Registered: 6-2010
Post Number: 316
Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 7:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

David, If you are successful, are you going to make this service available? If so about what do you think it would cost? Would you use automotive type inserts? Are there any available at Std Kohler 20 crank size? You should get lots of interest.

One other thought is if the Cam bearings are going first are they the source of particles that plug up the crank? I don't know what the oil flow is but someone here who loves these Kohlers ought to know.
Dan
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Scott Reynolds
Member
Username: Sreynolds
OH
Registered: 9-2007
Post Number: 453
Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 7:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I havn't heard about plugging with debris. The front rod gets the last of the oil. Thus it is the one that will seize if you don't understand the operation and maint of this engine.
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Dan Dillner
Member
Username: Captaindan
VT
Registered: 6-2010
Post Number: 317
Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 7:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Scott,
I was referencing the comment made by Mike above. I'm sure that the last in line gets the least anyway.
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wayne williams
Member
Username: Wickerk
SC
Registered: 4-2011
Post Number: 10
Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 8:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi, Guys might be looking at a 400 also for a rebuild. Present owner says if he had the money he would rebuild because the repower motors in he's opinion just don't sound as good and torque isn't the same. So if I buy it from him I believe I'm going with the rebuild after riding the 400 through some tall grass just sounds like a real tractor with the old kohler beast.
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Joe
Member
Username: Tractorjoe
PA
Registered: 2-2011
Post Number: 212
Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 8:25 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Do some reading on the Zinc additives that the EPA has removed from engine oil.. The zinc additives were there to protect engines with flat tappet camshafts and engines without bearing inserts.. Sound familiar? Since our government knows "whats best for us" they have decided since newer vehicles all have roller camshafts and of course babbitt bearing inserts there is no need for this "pollutant" in motor oil.. since they cant seem to see past the hoods of their prius they have no consern for the longevity of these old engines..they've decided to ban its use..
That is mostlikely the reason that it seems that after 20 years of reliable service, the old onans and kohlers have been chucking rods at a much higher rate in the last 4 or 5 years.


Truth be told tho... The Kohler EFI engine in my 400 runs and idles like a Lexus.. I wouldnt put a dime into an old opposed flathead if i were going to use it for daily use other than show or collector originality. Also around here with all the Landscaping businesses going toes up.. you can buy a commercial Zero turn mower with one of these engines on it for 500-600 or so.. use the engine on you Deere and part out or scrap the rest and wind up with a great engine for less than free.
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David C.Dunbar
Member
Username: Motiv8
MA
Registered: 11-2008
Post Number: 55
Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 10:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dan,
Yes, I have an insert in mind that fits a 1.6235/ 1.6240 jrnl.plus undersizes for reground cranks. Final fit dimension/clearance would always need verification. The kohler jrnl spec is:1.6245/1.6250. Once I've done a couple, cost effect is next. Yes, I'd make the service available. Zinc and Moly that Joe mentions is important. Been using it since the early '50s. Necessary on highly loaded sliding surfaces. David
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Rob
Member
Username: Rob31070
IN
Registered: 4-2011
Post Number: 28
Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 9:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I rebuilt my 532 earlier this year. I got all my parts from OPEE engines - I think in WA state. Great service - Got all my parts the next day here in Indiana. I had $900 in parts & machine work. I did all the work myself. I replaced all bushings. I installed new rods on std. Crank journals, Pistons .010"oversize, I replaced the valve guides and Tappets - used the original Cam . I installed an oil pressure gauge as recommended by many on this site. I had to shim the oil pressure reg spring to achieve 5 psi over spec. - Hot at Idle - Have about 75 hrs on it since overhaul - mostly tilling and pushing dirt / gravel on a major landscaping project mandated by my wife after I refused to by a new tractor at lowes and 'wasted' my money fixing my old tractor. I'm glad I rebuilt my engine. I really stewed over rebuild or repower .

I know what your going through trying to decide. Good luck in whichever path you decide to take.

you can get some good advice from the guys on this site.
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Jason Simmons
Member
Username: Jd_simmons
MO
Registered: 12-2010
Post Number: 46
Posted on Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - 9:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I went with a repower of my 400 last fall and am not looking back. It was a kit from Repower Specialist. (Bill Fallosk also repowered one of his 400's with them and we both have threads in the archives on our project here at WFM from late last fall/early this year.) After doing a lot of soul searching and looking at recommendations on this site, I felt this was best for me. I bought the tractor with uknown hours and it was always a hard start after being warm. After a ring and valve job, and yet another valve job, when it went awry again, I repowered. I had $1,000 in the first two jobs, and just under $2,000 in the repower. It just seemed like the right thing to do as I need my tractor to work.

It starts every time, and will shut off and restart. There were a few minor modifications that I had to take care of, most of which have been added to the kit by the dealer now (PTO support bracket; proper muffler to come out the side; purchased new throttle & choke cables).

The engine is probably a little more fuel efficient, but it will flat out get some work done as well. This past winter, we had two feet of snow, and I had 4 foot drifts down most all of my driveway. While it took quite a while to get it done, I cleared my 200 foot drive with a 54 inch plow in turf tires with chains. I pushed and plowed snow six to seven feet high. I know it was too big a job for the tractor, but with technique and a little patience, it got the job done. Thinking back, I'm not sure the K532 would have taken the abuse and the load from that storm.

The new Kohler is much, much lighter than the old K532. But it will get down and do a little gruntin' when necessary. I've not noticed torque being an issue.

If you can afford to do the work yourself and can endure the downtime with a rebuild (and future repairs), then maybe rebuilding is the way to go. If you need reliability and longevity, and can afford it, I would recommend the repower. Either way, I think you will be happy, at least until the next breakdown on the K532.

I do think, based upon the posts I have viewed on this site, that the K532 is troubled by lack of proper lubrication. If memory serves correct, it seems that it is always the right connecting rod that goes. Thus, if you do go this route, be sure and add the oil gauge (and remember to look at it when running the machine), and also consider adding the bearings suggested on the connecting rods.

My 2 cents, plus a little more.

JDS
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Tom Schaech
Member
Username: Tom_schaech
PA
Registered: 8-2007
Post Number: 96
Posted on Thursday, October 27, 2011 - 11:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

All:

I had many little problems with the B43G Onan in my 318 last year. Started to nickel and dime me to death. I, too, fretted over the options available. Decided that even after a rebuild, I'd still have a block, crank, and other parts with over 1300 hours on it. As Onan parts are expensive to begin with, I felt it was money well spent to install a new engine. I went with the Briggs 23HP Vanguard from Small Engine Warehouse. Came with all the accessories needed to complete the install, including a new PTO clutch. Now, I must say, there are several folks here who feel that SEW provides good service at the point of sale, but allegedly does not provide service or support when a problem is encountered. That being said, I had NO problems with the install. Everything was exactly as described---I had pulled the old engine out the week before and sold it. This gave me the time to replace a lot of other parts that were opportunistic, such as fuel lines, fuse holders, U joints, etc.

Upon completion I was amazed at the difference in power and fuel economy! This tractor is really a beast and now uses less than 1/2 the gas I was used to with the Onan. I have never looked back with this decision. I use this 318 for mowing, plowing both snow and gardens, pulling my 260 3-point mower, and a Trac Vac system.

Just my 2 cents worth. As others have said, it's your money and your tractor, you need to weigh all your options.

Keep us posted..

Tom
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Army
Member
Username: Army
ON
Registered: 6-2005
Post Number: 3679
Posted on Thursday, October 27, 2011 - 1:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I respect everyone's position on this topic because there is no correct answer to the question of whether to repower or not. It depends on the situation. I would feel differently if it was a collector and I wanted it all original, but my opinion is that a repower is the way to go for a working tractor. I wish now I had taken that stand on one of my 400's which has a rebuilt 532 in it. The original engine was blown when I bought the tractor and I paid $900 for another one that was rebuilt by an old small engine guy with a rep for doing good work. He had planned on putting it in an Allis Chalmers garden tractor but passed away before he could do that. I've put about 300 hours or so on it and the engine still works good but has started to smoke. At first it was only smoking at start up but now it's doing it after it's warmed up too and it's burning about a quart of oil every 50 hours or so. I'm going to run her it till she blows and then put a brand new EFI Kohler in it. That should last me for as long as I'll ever need it, unless they expect me to cut the grass at the old folk's home.


Army
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Don Elliott
Member
Username: Gonzodon
MO
Registered: 8-2011
Post Number: 4
Posted on Monday, October 31, 2011 - 9:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Great info and ideas here, wish I had read it 2 weeks ago before I ordered the parts for a rebuild of my 532. A couple of questions though, 1. is there any info on how and where to install the recommended oil pressure gauge and 2, where would I look to purchase an EFI Kohler if this rebuild fails. Thanks for the info, will start checking in more often.
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Mike Overbey
Member
Username: Mikeoverbey
IL
Registered: 10-2007
Post Number: 220
Posted on Monday, October 31, 2011 - 9:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I didn't spend as much money as most here, but I spent a lot of time looking for parts at a decent price. I got most of my parts from Pats Small Engine Plus. I had a blown rod and the crank was already turned, and so I'm getting another from Bob Colebank. The new piston styles and rings are VERY pricey, so I went with the old ($34 vs $125!!!) My cam gear was missing part of a tooth (plastic type) so I bought a used one for $20. I'm right around $400. Valves and guides are all good. Now, if I have a problem 300 hours down the road, I will be wishing I had done a repower. If it works, I will be glad I rebuilt it. I like rebuilding and like the originality.

Don,

Here is where I put my oil pressure gauge. It's the brass nipple near the front on top of the oil channel. Very convenient to get to.





Mike
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Don Elliott
Member
Username: Gonzodon
MO
Registered: 8-2011
Post Number: 6
Posted on Monday, October 31, 2011 - 10:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mike, thanks for the pics, will be installing on those little jewels before I put everything back together. what is an acceptable running oil pressure?
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Mike Overbey
Member
Username: Mikeoverbey
IL
Registered: 10-2007
Post Number: 222
Posted on Monday, October 31, 2011 - 10:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Don,

From the engine manual:

Oil Pressure
On models equipped with an oil pressure gauge, oil
pressure should range from 40-65 psi at operating
speeds above 1800 RPM on a cool engine. On a
warm engine it may vary between 30-55 psi.
NOTE: Oil pressure may be as low as 10 psi at idle
speeds of 1000 RPM when engine is warm.

I think I have mine set at 40 psi warm.

I think the MOST important thing on this engine is to make sure that you actually have 2 quarts of oil in it, and that your dip stick is marked correctly. The dip stick is so long and unsupported that it tends to get loose. Then you screw it in..and in...and in... look at this picture and look how far down the tube got screwed in. Guess how much oil was really in the pan when this failed?? I can't take credit for this discovery, I learned it from Harold Goff. It's been like this on every K532/582 I've seen.



The tube and stick are lined up on that, so it shows you where the oil would be. When full, the whole oil pan is virtually full. I'm going to make a support for the top of the tube, and make a stop (bead of weld, collar etc) for the bottom. I'll seal it at the bottom also to keep it from leaking. Those threads are not real good anymore.

Mike
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Don Elliott
Member
Username: Gonzodon
MO
Registered: 8-2011
Post Number: 7
Posted on Monday, October 31, 2011 - 2:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks again Mike, you are quite a wealth of knowledge on these engines, being new to them I am going to ask some questions that most experienced hands would already know. You said you had your oil pressure set at 40 PSI warm, is that to say there is an adjustment for the oil pressure and is it described in the shop manual, I am out of town on business now and do not have that with me or I would look it up. Do you have any other tips or secrets that someone new to 400's should know? Any advice would be appreciated.
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Mike Overbey
Member
Username: Mikeoverbey
IL
Registered: 10-2007
Post Number: 223
Posted on Tuesday, November 01, 2011 - 3:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Don,

I can't claim to be a wealth of knowledge, I'm just sharing some things that I've either discovered after rebuilding a few of them, or talking to some of these guys on here that really know their stuff. Most of the guys I'm talking about posted above. The pressure adjustment is pretty straight-forward, especially with the oil pressure gauge already hooked up. The procedure is in your manual. It is accomplished by screwing in a bolt that applies spring pressure to a check ball.

As far as any other nuances, I can't think of any at this moment. Maybe one of the others above can chime in here with some tips. Welcome to the forum. As you can tell, if you have a question, just post it with some pictures and someone will probably be along with an answer. The experience of this group is utterly amazing and keeps you from having to learn it the hard way. Good luck.

Mike
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Don Elliott
Member
Username: Gonzodon
MO
Registered: 8-2011
Post Number: 8
Posted on Tuesday, November 01, 2011 - 9:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks again Mike, I will make the adjustments after I get rebuilt and Gauge installed.
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Mike Meyer
Member
Username: 7dad34
Illinois
Registered: 3-2007
Post Number: 1431
Posted on Wednesday, November 02, 2011 - 5:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm happy to say the new owner of my 400 sure is happy with it ! The tractor itself is a beast of a garden tractor . I agree with Army, time spent arguing over repower v rebuild is wasted. I feel that knowing now what we know about the 532/582 is good information to have and with all the wealth of information from all the 400 owners is why we're here to begin with. If my friend takes care of my old beast and watches that oil pressure gauge, it should last him a very good long time and he has a very strong tractor.
If you go with a newer engine, you'll still have one heck of a tractor . In fact, if I ever get the chance to get the property I would love to have, the first thing I would do is go looking for an old broken down 400...and rebuild that engine !
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Army
Member
Username: Army
ON
Registered: 6-2005
Post Number: 3726
Posted on Friday, November 04, 2011 - 4:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mikey.. the new 400 owner got a good one.

Mike O's point about dipsticks being inaccurate is a good one. None of my three 400's had an accurate oil full level when I checked them. It's pretty easy. Next complete oil change check to see where the oil is on the stick when you're done. If it's wrong grab a hacksaw and mark the proper full level on it. Just make sure you put the correct amount of oil in the engine and run it for a little bit so the filter is full. Then wait long enough for the oil to drain down. Best plan is to let it sit overnight.


Army
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David C.Dunbar
Member
Username: Motiv8
MA
Registered: 11-2008
Post Number: 109
Posted on Saturday, November 05, 2011 - 6:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Army,
FWIW, Generally,I think the best oil level ck would be immediately after a shut down on a level surface. This would apply to almost any wet sump engine. You want to know the sump level while all lines and filters are still mostly full and oil is warm/hot. Some units can vary 2 qts between methods, although not K532 or anthing on WFM. David
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Army
Member
Username: Army
ON
Registered: 6-2005
Post Number: 3729
Posted on Saturday, November 05, 2011 - 7:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

David.. you'll have to elaborate. I check the oil before I use a tractor, which is typically after it has been parked over night so I mark the stick for the amount of oil that's in the pan when the engine is cold. I could mark the stick when it's hot and check it when it's hot but I don't see how that would be better.


Army
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Jim George
Member
Username: Dustyt
Ont
Registered: 10-2011
Post Number: 11
Posted on Saturday, November 05, 2011 - 11:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Even worse, if the engine is mounted at angle in the tractor. Some of the bolens tractors are like that. I had a 19hp kohler. I checked the oil and found it real low. I added oil to the full mark and started the tractor it proceeded to blow oil like crazy. Turns out the engine only holds 1.4 litres. With the engine on a slant like that. I would think it reduces your safety range,
at least a bit.
Jim

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